Inside Brussels Airlines: how an airline gets ready for takeoff after 12 weeks of hibernation

Inside Brussels Airlines: how an airline gets ready for takeoff after 12 weeks of hibernation

Aircraft are not made to stand still. And the same goes for our colleagues, who have missed their jobs dearly. We're happy that on Monday, we will finally hit the skies again. But restarting flight operations after 12 weeks of hibernation doesn't happen overnight. Getting an aircraft out of parking mode and making it airworthy again takes about as much time as parking it. Getting our flying staff back up in the air is also something that isn't taken lightly.

In normal circumstances, a commercial pilot who flies on a regular basis goes through a strict training regime every 6 months, to keep up with all procedures. Now that our pilots have not been in a cockpit for 3 months and do not meet the mandatory "3 landings in 90 days" standard, we need to retrain them to make sure they are ready to get back in the cockpit. A simulator test, as well as a theoretical exam and Crew Resource Management training help get them ready for 15 June.

Also our cabin crew colleagues get a refresher course and are trained to apply the new procedures and measures that we have put in place.

As for our birds, they are pretty high maintenance, even when they have been on the ground for a long period. Remember how we told you that the storage of an aircraft takes about 400 man hours and they still require regular checks and maintenance? Well, unpacking an aircraft and making it airworthy again takes about 200 man hours, too. From testing all computer systems, getting the cabin ready, to unwrapping the landing gear and engines, nothing is left to chance in aviation.

This series of photos and videos shows the unpacking of our aircraft, as well as the training of our pilots. You can download and use the pictures below with copyright Brussels Airlines. Footage of the unpacking process as well as the pilot training can be downloaded here

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Brussels Airlines

Brussels Airlines is the home carrier of Belgium and one of the four network airlines of the Lufthansa Group. It connects the European capital from Brussels Airport with over 85 destinations, 17 of which are in Sub Saharan Africa. The company employs 3,100 people and operates 41 aircraft.

Brussels Airlines aims to emit 50% less CO2 by 2030 compared to 2019 and plans to be carbon neutral by 2050. The airline is participating in the Stargate Project led by Brussels Airport and is therefore part of the testing ground for sustainable aviation at its home base. In addition, the airline signed the Circular Economy agreement of the Antwerp Management School in 2021. In 2023, Brussels Airlines welcomes three state-of-the-art Airbus A320neo allowing the airline to significantly lower its CO2- and noise-emissions on its medium-haul network. Next to that, the airline aims to operate its first flight using Sustainable Aviation fuel (SAF) by 2023.

As an ambassador of its country, Brussels Airlines brings the world to Belgium and the best of Belgium to the world, among others through collaborations with Belgian Star Chefs, Belgian culinary products and the  Belgian Icons, specially painted aircraft that honor a Belgian iconic person, team or event to promote Belgian culture worldwide.

More information on brusselsairlines.com 

Brussels Airlines
b.house
Zone General Aviation - Airport Building 26
1831 Diegem